Ruffed Grouse

Also Goes By: Wood Grouse, Willow Patridge, Ruff

The Ruffed Grouse is about the size of a chicken and has a ruff on their neck, a thick body with a moderately long and rounded tail and a crest atop their head that sometimes lays flat. This bird has two color phases: red and gray. The red will be a brown color and the gray will have a gray body. Both are mottled dark and light spots. While Minnesota boasts the top Ruffed Grouse production in the United States, this bird is common to the northern and far west United States in addition to Canada. 

The Ruffed Grouse can be found in second growth pines, thick brush and aspen where it can camouflage itself with its illusory plumage. It is very helpful to bring along a good hunting dog that will work close when seeking out this grouse because of its fast, explosive flush. A light fast-handling gun that won’t be caught up in the trees is ideal for this kind of bird. During the winter, the Ruffed Crouse will burrow in the snow or adeptly walk atop it, giving the hunter the opportunity to locate tracks and use these to their advantage.

Orvis Upland Shell

Orvis Upland Shell

Besides doing their part to support public access, Orvis is also making some great improvements to their upland gear. When the leaves have yet to drop and shooting windows are minute, the ruffed grouse leave no time for thinking or for fumbling with the mount of the shotgun. The thing I like most about the Orvis Upland Shell ($198) … Read more

Upland Monster

Bag Limits Creating Monsters

The first game bird bag limits in this country were established by the state of Iowa in 1878 as a way to protect remaining populations of Prairie Chicken, Ruffed Grouse and Woodcock. Iowa didn’t employ game wardens until nine years later, so it remains a mystery how such limits were enforced.* Today, bag limits are … Read more