Hungarian Partridge

Also Goes By: Gray Partridge, Hun, Hunkie

This rotund bird has a white belly, gray flanks and chest and a brown back. Growing to about a foot long, the Hungarian Partridge has a diet consisting of mainly seeds. However, juveniles will consume insects as a source of protein as they grow. They prefer open grassy areas and agricultural territories like cornfields. 

A more skittish bird, the Hungarian Partridge will flush while the hunter is still 30 yards away or more, issuing a warning squawk before fleeing. Often they will flush as a covey and fly several hundred yards before gathering again on open ground, always flushing again as the hunter continues to give chase. A persistent hunter may find that the Hungarian Partridge will eventually split off from the covey to further deter their pursuer. However, this can offer the opportunity for more close range shooting. Once snow has fallen, the Hungarian Partridge becomes even more aloof, albeit easier to locate. A good 12 or 20 gauge with a full choke is ideal for hunting this bird.

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