Home » Bird Hunting Gear » Camping

Category: Camping

Eddie Bauer Alchemist 40/55 Pack

Eddie Bauer Alchemist

 

When you’re headed into the backcountry bird hunting, it’s always a balancing act between how much gear you can carry yet still have enough legs left once camped to follow dogs in pursuit of birds. I was able to easily pack four days and three nights worth of gear and food in Eddie Bauer’s Alchemist. The pack’s best feature is once you get a remote camp setup you are able to collapse the expansion and travel light for day use carrying only the essentials – water, snacks, dog treats and extra shells. It rides high, is comfortable to wear regardless the load and easy to shoot while wearing. Don’t let the rock climbing origins deceive you, this pack is perfect for backcountry upland – $150 click here to learn more.

Thermacell Backpacker

Thermacell Backpacker

 

Biting bugs can ruin a backcountry trip. Since most of our hunting occurs after the frosts of fall, insects are rarely a nuisance. But when training in the off-season or even hunting in early-season those bugs can be absolutely maddening. I was one of the original testers of the Thermacell Backpacker at high elevation. The feature I like best is that it uses the same fuel canisters as our back country cook-stove so no extra weight is needed to carry this featherweight (4 oz) vampire repeller – $42 with two 24-hour mosquito repellant refills, click here to learn more.

Cabela’s Alaknak Tent

Cabela's Alaknak

 

Backcountry bird camp isn’t complete without a wall tent. But ditch the heavy canvas tent and opt for the Cabela’s Alaknak instead. Made of waterproof 250-denier polyester, the tent features 10 perimeter poles and one center pole for durability in harsh weather. The 12×12 Alaknak withstood a powerful thunderstorm at 11,000 feet in Colorado while chasing blue grouse earlier this year. The tent provided plenty of living space for two hunters, three dogs, gear, and a Camp Chef Camp Oven. Bonus feature: a stove pipe jack in the roof for warm nights during late season hunts – $900 click here to learn more.

ThermaCELL

ThermaCELL

There is a lot of down time during the season. Early on when the weather is still hot, that down time brings a whole host of annoying biting bugs to camp which make getting rest a challenge. We have to admit that we had our doubts with the plastic appearance of the ThermaCELL ($26.99). At our wit’s end we were willing to try anything and this little unit delivered.  Biting flies and mosquitos hate it, which guarantees we love it. You can’t put DEET on the dogs and it’s probably not a great idea to cake it on yourself either and with the ThermaCELL you no longer have to. Purchase a ThermaCELL.

 

Helio Pressure Shower

Helio Shower

Hunting in Alaska this year I went 20 days without a shower. Never again. NEMO makes the Helio Pressure Shower ($99) specifically for these backcountry adventures. It’s also a great solution for hosing off bird dogs that have rolled in mystery stench. Honestly, in Alaska I may have smelled worse than the dogs. The Helio packs up small and tucks away in a corner until needed.

[yasr_visitor_votes size=”small”]

 

[yasr_overall_rating size=”medium”]

The Brute Cooler

Brute Cooler

The Brute Cooler is appropriately named — hard core, roto-molded, large handles, rubber latches — it’s got it all. Made in America by Brute, a family run company with excellent customer service. The 50 qt. ($319) will keep your birds chilled for at least five days, but go with the 75 qt. ($369) if you want to throw lunch and drinks on board too.

[yasr_visitor_votes size=”small”]

 

[yasr_overall_rating size=”medium”]

Camp Chef Rainier Campers Combo Stove

campchefrainier

Small and portable, the Camp Chef Rainier Campers Combo Stove ($153) is complete with a one-burner stove, and a non-stick griddle and grill. The griddle and grill are easily switched for making pancakes in the morning, to grilling venison for dinner. Complete with a matchless ignition for ease of use, the Camper’s Combo is the perfect stove for hunting and camping adventures. I was fortunate enough to use the Rainier Camper’s Combo in North Dakota during my 3-day wild bird hunt camp. The stove performed flawlessly while cooking antelope over the grill, and even in tight quarters as my fellow hunters and I squeezed into a smaller camper to avoid freezing rain. Venison was grilled to medium-rare perfection, while noodles were boiling on the burner. Click here for the latest pricing. 

 

UST Wetfire Tinder

UST Wetfire

A human can survive without food for three weeks. Hypothermia and exposure are the real killers in the wild. I’ve added the UST WetFire™ Tinder ($7) to my vest as part of my mobile first aid and survival gear. In the event I can’t make it back to the truck due to weather, injury or poor navigation skills I will now always be able to start a fire and stay warm.

[yasr_visitor_votes size=”small”]

 

[yasr_overall_rating size=”medium”]

NEMO Equipment Dagger Tent

Dagger

The NEMO Equipment Dagger 2 Person Tent weighed in a full 2 lbs. lighter than my old backpacking tent. That may not sound like much but when you’re talking about hauling a crammed backpack miles up a mountain over 9,000′ above sea level, those couple pounds are fairly pronounced. We’ve become fans of NEMO’s equipment which is well thought out and designed. Easy setup, ample floor space for two bird dogs and one hunter (jump up to the 3P if another hunter is in tow), roomy vestibules for extra gear and extra headroom in this tent created by a single pole system means you never end up leaving poles on the mountain in a rushed pack out.

[yasr_visitor_votes size=”small”]

 

[yasr_overall_rating size=”medium”]