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Author: Brian Koch

You Can’t Spell Hypocrite without REI

REI store

The Federal Aid and Wildlife Restoration Act, known throughout most of the hunting and shooting community as the Pittman-Robertson Act (P-R), was created in 1937 by congress to reverse the damages of market hunting and ensure the longevity of wild places and wildlife for future generations. Details and amendments of the act are extensive but to summarize: a 10% excise tax is levied on all firearms, handgun accessories, ammunitions and archery equipment. The funds generated are dedicated, they do not go to the U.S. Treasury but to a trust managed by the Department of the Interior. The money must be used for conservation and is divvied-up to states using a formula of land mass and population. For most state wildlife agencies, Pittman-Robertson along with the funds generated by the sale of hunting and fishing licenses is the core of operating budgets. Since inception P-R has generated over $11 billion for the maintenance and management of wild places.

Hunters and anglers fund the outdoors at the state level for the enjoyment of all. Hikers, bikers, campers, kayakers, climbers, skiers—there are no equivalent license fees and no excise taxes on these pursuits. Why does this matter?

Last week a retailer of outdoor equipment, REI, suspended all purchases of Vista Outdoors goods. Vista is the parent company for many brands you might normally see in outdoor stores including Camp Chef, Giro, Bell, Camelbak and Blackburn. Vista is also well-known in the shooting sports industry for brands such as Federal Premium Ammunition and Savage Arms.

“REI does not sell guns. We believe that it is the job of companies that manufacture and sell guns and ammunition to work towards common sense solutions that prevent the type of violence that happened in Florida last month.” (read REI’s full statement) The apparent underlying logic is that Vista Outdoors should be policing customers and fighting crime should be part of gear maker’s business model.

Corporate social responsibility is becoming a more prominent feature in business. There can be tangible and true results from such initiatives. But maybe the goals of that social responsibility need to be more closely scrutinized. Attempting profit from promoting divisiveness seems counter to the spirit of positive social change.

REI sells outdoor gear, so let’s take a look at something directly in their wheelhouse. Since 1976 REI has donated $77 million to conservation. Last year they donated $9.3 million to the outdoors. Those may sound like big numbers until held up against annual sales of $2.56 billion. This means that REI donated just one-third of 1% of sales to support the wild places from which it garners mountains of money.

In 2017 alone Vista Outdoors’ brands generated $87 million for the Federal Aid and Wildlife Restoration Act—more money in a single year than REI donated in 42 years. Hunters and target shooters are paying a premium on products in support of the outdoors. REI is profiting from shooting sports’ investment, then pointing a scolding finger with the hand opposite the one clutching cash.

Until REI and other outdoor brands begin paying their fair share in support of wild places and wildlife from which they profit, consider purchasing directly from the brands that do support the outdoors. A great place to start is 2% for Conservation—www.fishandwildlife.org—which asks businesses to contribute 1% of their gross sales and 1% of their employees’ time. REI is $16.3 million short and would need to provide 252,000 hours of time to meet this basic level of outdoor stewardship that other hunting and fishing companies are leading.

If we held REI to the same standards hunters have been held to for decades, they should be donating $256 million annually. A sizable chunk of this could be accomplished by asking members of REI’s co-op to donate the dividends they receive annually to support wild places. That could account for $194 million and might offer more sturdy footing for preaching to shooting sports manufactures.



 

 

The Streak

Shooting Streak

Rio the setter is holding just below a lip of pitted volcanic stone a few paces up this 60 degree slope. We’ve climbed for over two hours to get to this point. The entire trek from the bottom the dogs have been trailing and repositioning. I can tell by Rio’s stature that she has trapped birds that have outrun us all the way uphill. She refuses to even sneak a glance my direction or acknowledge the young lab, Ida, beginning to close in on her find. I’m able to reset my feet on nearly level ground and catch a few deep breaths as Ida moves in to flush. A large covey of Chukar launches off the lab’s nose and begins to glide down the slope from right to left. For anyone else watching it all must appear a blur, a span of maybe three seconds. But for me these moments are as slow as time has gotten this season. Seeing every wingbeat in the vivid detail of elastic time, I pick a big bird and bring the bead to meet the dark mask expecting the fold on the snap of the trigger. But this red-leg never flinches. I follow with the second barrel again with no effect.

Time regains standard pace with my muttering a few choice words as the group sails hundreds of feet below us and around a point. I’m disgusted by the blemish on this perfect moment. But it’s something I’ve become painfully accustomed to this season.

I’ve always been a streaky shooter. Doesn’t really matter how much practice or repetition, I’m either hot or cold. Normally the streaks come and go without much warning or fanfare. I opened last season as deadly as I’ve ever been. The shotgun felt weightless and swung in a harmony with flushing birds that would fall as if by another’s hand. For much of the year, with a few breaks, that magic was uninterrupted.

During the summer months of training and shooting the hot streak continued, testing gear and breaking clays with good effect. Between shooting with friends, instructing and training with the new puppy the amount of off-season powder burnt was exponentially higher than most years. I started to believe that I’d finally broken through, ended the streakiness, become a shooter.

But I will always remember the start of this year as the season the broad side of the barn wasn’t even big enough.

No matter whether it was five yards or 50, straight away, straight up, quartering….. birds would not drop. I was seeing flushes well, picking out individuals, the gun mount felt the same as it always had. Yet no feathers could be cut. It was as if the birds were pulling Matrix moves and flying between shot. No matter the terrain, open mountains to dense woods, no matter how fair or foul the weather, there were no conditions that could cure this malady.

I’m already somewhat superstitious. So, when a piss-poor shooting string like this happens I start wondering which crack I stepped on, or which undisclosed rule I’ve broken to anger the bird gods to a level of disdain that they’ve chosen to armor plate all birds in my path.

This kicks off iterations of exorcism that truly start sounding insane. During hot streaks I don’t clean my gun because I don’t want to wash any good mojo off of it. But when a streak this cold arrives I break it down to the elements, clean everything.

Cleaning didn’t work.

I started shuffling choke tubes with ADHD fervor. No effect.

I switched ammo from favorite shells to alternate brands and loads…… three times. This is ill-advised during the midst of a hunting trip but desperation calls for extreme measures. No effect. At the conclusion of the trip I took this rainbow of shells and a stack of paper plates, measured out different distances and began shooting them with each load and each choke. Then I hired child labor to count the number of holes in each plate — easiest $20 my niece ever made. She’s likely hoping there are more cold streaks in the future. It’s not like I haven’t patterned this shotgun before but I’m at the end of my rope.

It’s not the gun or the ammo, though I elect to tighten chokes from my standard setup in order to make it more difficult for armored birds.

Then I start thinking my eyes are failing me. Am I actually seeing birds differently? I start closing alternating eyes, trying to read road signs at different distances while driving. I manage to convince myself that there’s pressure building up in my eyeball and there is potential for complete blindness at any minute. I start raining drops into eyes trying to prevent the coming darkness.

There’s no resulting bird lethality but at least my eyelids feel super slick from four different kinds of eyedrops.

I order new shooting glasses just in case the microscopic scratches on this used pair are distorting my view. Of course that’s not it either.

Obviously the forces at work here are strong. I’ve been hexed. I’ve angered someone with a story about tailgate photos or talk of Federal Upland Stamps to the point that they purchased a lock of my hair from the barber and made a voodoo doll. Then they stuck that doll’s tiny shotgun in his ass. And there’s nothing I can do about it. The chicken blood I need to break such a curse would require me to kill a bird and I apparently will never shoot another one again. I’m officially cutting my own hair from now on.

I give up.

I’m resigned to my fate as a birder and vegan once my freezer runs dry. I’ll keep carrying a shotgun to give the dogs a pittance of hope.

This streak has been trying. But it isn’t the result of equipment malfunction or even some witch. It’s my own preaching. My sermons always conclude with finding success in the hunt beyond the heft of the game bag. Now that’s come full circle, testing my own faith. But I believe. No streak will convince me that this upland pursuit is dependent on killing birds. The hundreds of miles covered with horrible shooting hasn’t weakened that resolve.

Maybe all it takes is that acknowledgement.

The birds begin dropping again. Hopefully these shots will set off a new era of shooting success. Because honestly the idea of becoming a vegan wasn’t very appealing.

Target plates

Testing shotguns


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Orvis Pro Series Vest

Orvis Pro Series Vest

 

The upland game vest may be the single most-utilized piece of gear in upland hunting. Regardless the terrain, bird species, weather conditions…. the vest is always part of the hunt. Depending on the time of year, it has to fit over different layers, carry different loads, securely stow essential gear. And for me it’s gotta fit like a well-worn glove. The Orvis Pro Series Vest has multiple strap adjustments reminiscent of a backpack, so the game pouch and pockets ride exactly where you want them. No matter your frame size, this vest should adjust to exactly how you are most comfortable busting cover. Zipping pockets to lockdown keys, licenses and phones. An expanding game bag could carry a bushel of birds. The hydration bladder compatibility allows me to carry a gallon for dogs to extend our range on hot days. Beefy buckles and materials, lightweight, solidly stitched — this vest is gonna be a constant companion for the foreseeable seasons – $189 click here to learn more.

Midland X-Talker T75

Midland Walkie Talkie

 

Walkie talkies may not be considered standard upland gear…… but maybe they should be. These Midland X-Talker radios let me check-in with a another remote hunter across miles of mountainous terrain without having to drop elevation to verify safety and location. And if you’re hunting with friends driving multiple vehicles, these radios are faster and more convenient than cell phones. The 38-mile range is terrain dependent, but we were able to stay in touch across 8 miles of forested peaks with no problems. The X-Talkers have great battery life and the Weather Scan is an added safety feature making them a must-have for backcountry adventure – $90 click here to learn more.

Filson Ultra Light Weight Jacket

Filson Ultra Light Jacket

 

Filson may have built their reputation on their indestructible Tin Cloth, but if they keep turning out jackets like this Ultra Light Weight made from ripstop Cordura® the mantle could be passed. For a weather-resistant jacket, the warmth-to-weight ratio is amazing due largely to the PrimaLoft Gold® Insulation which retains it’s insulating capabilities even when wet. Worn under an upland vest the absence of bulk allows you to stay warm without changing the mount or pull length of the shotgun for shooting consistency. Zippered pockets give another place to safely stow important items. And in the event you get too warm in changing weather conditions, the Ultra Light Weight Jacket rolls up and is unnoticeable in the game pouch. Most hunters will probably opt for the Field Olive but the Raven looks deadly with a blaze vest –  $295 click here to learn more.

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Gerber Center Drive Multi-tool

Gerber Multi-tool

 

There are tons of multi tools on the market. Tons. The reason the Gerber Center Drive has made it into my every day carry is one thing, military grade rotatable carbide wire cutters. These cutters give me a level of confidence that if my dogs are ever caught in a snare, I have a chance to free them quickly with minimal injury. Yes, I like the spring-loaded pliers, knife, file, bottle opener, screwdriver and all the other bells and whistles on this multi-tool. But the replaceable carbide cutters are what puts this in my vest and makes it irreplaceable to me – $85 click here to learn more.

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Eddie Bauer Alchemist 40/55 Pack

Eddie Bauer Alchemist

 

When you’re headed into the backcountry bird hunting, it’s always a balancing act between how much gear you can carry yet still have enough legs left once camped to follow dogs in pursuit of birds. I was able to easily pack four days and three nights worth of gear and food in Eddie Bauer’s Alchemist. The pack’s best feature is once you get a remote camp setup you are able to collapse the expansion and travel light for day use carrying only the essentials – water, snacks, dog treats and extra shells. It rides high, is comfortable to wear regardless the load and easy to shoot while wearing. Don’t let the rock climbing origins deceive you, this pack is perfect for backcountry upland – $150 click here to learn more.

onX Hunt

onX Hunt

 

The ability to accurately and easily identify public hunting land in any state across the country is now at your fingertips. The onX Hunt App is a GPS on steroids: National Forest, BLM, Wildlife Management Areas, State Trust Land, even the names of private land owners who you may wish to seek out for permission to chase birds on their property. The volume of information available is amazing. If cell service is known to be spotty, maps can be preloaded for off-grid capabilities, no cell tower, no problem. And with the latest version hunters can share waypoints via text, email, or any other messaging apps that are enabled on the users smartphones. The onX Hunt App is a must have for any outdoor enthusiast – $30 per year per state, $100 per year for all 50 states, click here to learn more.

Lowa Irox GTX Mid

Lowa Irox

 

100% vegan boots. Let that sink in for a bit…….a hunter wearing vegan boots. Now what does that really mean? One thing I know for sure is when leather gets wet it gets heavy. And heavy feet aren’t good when covering lots of miles. Whether shale slides, gnarly grouse woods or prairie grasses, upland boots need to perform, preferably just a single pair. That’s a tough ask but the Lowa Irox GTX have risen to the task. Waterproof GORE-TEX® lined, fully synthetic, lightweight with toe and heel abrasion guards, a fairly rigid sole to protect from repetitious pounding. I’ve been impressed with the Irox performance and it may be the first season I can remember where a single pair of boots survives the entire gauntlet. Hardiest vegan we’ve ever encountered – $260 click here to learn more.

Benchmade 560 Freek

Benchmade 560

 

We’re perennial fans of Benchmade knives: high-quality, edge retention, one handed opening, reversible clips on most models. What’s not to like? But here’s what makes the Freek stand out: it’s crazy lightweight. Benchmade has found a way to replace some of the metal components with space-age materials that don’t compromise quality. Unlike other Benchmade models, the Freek’s handle is made of Versaflex which makes it grippy. Why that’s important for birdhunters is pretty simple – it’s stickier in the pocket, not exactly glued in there but seeded. While walking through heavy cover the branches or thick brush aren’t going to be able to pry the Freek from its place. The ability to clean birds back at the truck is always better than cursing the pickpockets afield – $111 click here to learn more.

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